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Avoiding Tire Failure: Keep Yourself and Your Passengers Always Safe

Posted by on Jun 16, 2015 in Car Accidents | 0 comments

Regardless of the type of vehicle you drive, its tires always play a critical part in your overall safety. Thus, to ensure tire safety at all times and avoid different kinds of tire failure, such as flat tire, blowout or tread separation, the US Department of Transportation’s National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), strongly emphasizes the importance of:

  • keeping the weight of your vehicle’s passengers and cargo within the your tire’s and vehicle’s load limits;
    making sure that you maintain proper tire pressure
  • Regularly inspecting your vehicle’s tires for any type of irregularities, like slashes, cuts, exposed metal wires and some mesh
  • Avoiding road hazards

The most common causes of tire failure are overloaded vehicles and underinflated tires; avoiding these things, however, and keeping your tires properly maintained can very well result to improved traction, stopping and steering, as well as a longer tire life.

NHTSA’s yearly records show more than 8,000 serious car accidents due to tire blowout and failures. According to the website of a Tennessee personal injury attorney at Pohl Berk, LLP, resulting injuries from these accidents are worse if the driver was driving at high speeds; risks of serious wrecks and vehicle rollovers are increased too.

Often, however, failure is a result not of old and worn out tires, underinflated tires, or improperly maintained ones, but of faulty manufacturing design, poor quality materials, or failure of the manufacturer to comply with government standards.

Faulty design in tires is usually a result of poor quality control, use of low-quality materials, such as very old dry rubber stock, improper curing and adhesion, foreign matter cured into tires (like water, wood, wires, bolts and screws, gloves, live shotgun shells, chicken bones, and other totally absurd materials that irresponsible tire plant workers can think of), stressed workers who work on twelve-hour shifts, and emphasis of some manufacturers on quantity (or production) over quality and safety.

People knowledgeable in tire safety advise drivers who get involved in accidents (due to tire failure) to photograph their vehicle’s tire immediately after the accident. The overall condition of a tire, especially exposed wires, after an accident can help tell what particular manufacturing failure was committed by tire plant workers, like adhesion defect if the wires get exposed and moisture contamination if the exposed wires are rusty.

Manufacturers will face full civil liability once their manufacturing negligence is proven, a liability that can translate to thousands or millions of dollars in compensation, depending on the severity of the injury suffered by the victim.

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